Study Global News

Herbs & Wortcunning Course Summary
A great class to help you understand the magical, medicinal and other uses for herbs and plants from gardening or growing your own indoors to... Read More...
IMAGE Part II: Where is Power?
In Part I we talked about the self defeating programming that takes power from within you and gives it to things outside of yourself. (similar to... Read More...
IMAGE Part VI: Worship
Part VI: Worship; or, giving yourself permission to connect with what moves you in whatever way you deem best What is being a real practitioner? As... Read More...
IMAGE Mead Magic
Mead is often referred to as the Nectar of the Gods, or the Drink of Love. It is a delightful ritual beverage that can add depth to your rituals and... Read More...
IMAGE Hot For You Hot Cocoa
A Recipe & A Bit of Magic! This is a recipe for wonderful hot cocoa mix powder (may I offer you a hot beverage?).  The spell is an excerpt from... Read More...
IMAGE Stones for Magic & Spells
Stones are excellent tools for spells and magic.  You can use them in a number of ways, but stone pouches are a convenient tool for energy and... Read More...
IMAGE A Guide to Amber & Jet
As you can see from the picture, there are many types of amber, and these are often confused with each other, as well as with ambergris, copal and... Read More...
IMAGE Working With Crystals & Stones Course Guide
This is the course index for the Working With Crystals & Stones class.  Your studies will be easier if you go through each lesson in... Read More...
IMAGE 1: What is Quartz Crystal?
Welcome to the newest course available in the PaganPath Academy! The first two lessons of this online class are available to the public. Please... Read More...
IMAGE Resources for Nebraska Pagans
Volute wrote this response to an email from a Witch moving to the Lincoln, NE area.  If you are in the area or plan to move there, you may find... Read More...
IMAGE Besom Briefs
A besom is a broom used by some Witches, especially for Handfasting and Imbolc (around February 2) rites.  Because we hope to offer information... Read More...
IMAGE 2016 PaganPath Almanacs & Calendars
Welcome to the 19th edition of the PaganPath Almanac. Great improvements have been made over the years based on your input and our growing... Read More...
IMAGE Beltane - Maypole Dance
The Beltane season has that quivering anticipation, similar to Samhain.  Filled with a sense of magic and quickening, it is a time of growth and... Read More...
IMAGE Your Tarot Manual
Your Tarot Cards User's Maintenance Manual (The one they forgot to include with your cards.) Forget the superstitious mumbo jumbo. Clear your head of... Read More...
IMAGE About the Tarot Class & Cards
Designed to help you become proficient in reading the tarot without consulting a reference book, this course is excellent for both beginners and... Read More...
IMAGE Make Your Own Scarab
This is a good project to do with kids, and for the kid in you!  You can create your own scarab fetish and inscribe symbols and words that are... Read More...
IMAGE Making a Ouija or Talking Board
Making your own ouija board or "talking board" can be very easy.  You can also have someone with more experience make one for you, but the rewards... Read More...
IMAGE House Cleansing & Blessing Ritual
This home ritual is designed to cleanse a house of negativity, but it is also designed to create a positive and balanced atmosphere which encourages... Read More...
IMAGE Alter Your Altar: Alternative Altars
Your altar reflects who you are and what your energy is like at this point in your life. It can even be a reflection of the goals you wish to... Read More...
IMAGE Theban Script or "Witchs' Runes"
Theban Script is an alphabet used by many Pagans, Witches and Wiccans as a to prevent prying eyes from reading private entries in Books of Shadows... Read More...
IMAGE Scarabs: History, Symbolism, Uses
Scarab Symbolism & Uses The popularity of the scarab (pronounced SCARE ub) in Ancient Egyptian culture is undisputed.  The scarabs from Friday's... Read More...
IMAGE Online Class Participation
Welcome to the ComprehensiveWitchcraft & Wicca Course Let there be Beauty and Strength, Power and Compassion, Honor and Humility, Mirth and... Read More...
IMAGE About the Witchcraft Course
If you are not already a Premium Member, you can enroll from this page. You will have full access to the Academy and all online classes for a Year... Read More...
IMAGE The PPe-Tarot: A Digital Tarot Deck & Free Reading
Your free online tarot reading, and much of the The Online Tarot Class in the Academy is illustrated with the PPe-Tarot. The PPe-Tarot was developed... Read More...
IMAGE The Elder Futhark Runes
The following interpretations of the meanings of the Elder Futhark1 runes are summarized from my research through dozens of books and manuscripts.... Read More...
IMAGE Dragon's Blood
(Shop)Dragon's Blood Resin comes from the collected and dried sap of many plant genera.  Usually it is harvested from a type of spiny, climbing... Read More...
IMAGE The Garden's Unseen Magical Forces
There are unseen forces working their magic in your garden! Have you ever printed a photograph when your ink cartridge is out of yellow ink? ... Read More...
IMAGE Pagan & Craft Traditions
Traditions are also known as "Trads". By necessity, these definitions are general. Each Witch in every tradition could define his or her path... Read More...
IMAGE The Four Quarters or Corners
In This Article:  What are the Quarters?  •  How are the Quarters Called?  •  Deosil vs. Widdershins What are the... Read More...

In OfficeMargot Adler died 10:30am Monday, July 28, 2014 in her apartment overlooking Central Park in New York's Upper West Side. She had been diagnosed with endometrial cancer in early 2011, which metastasized over the next three years. Her son, Alex, cared for her in the few months before her death when she began experiencing more serious symptoms.

Margot Adler's influence resonates through every Pagan community and Pagan path. In her 68 years she authored several books and worked at National Public Radio (NPR), being a general assignment reporter, and her reports were featured on NPR's broadcasts of "All Things Considered", “Morning Edition,” and “Weekend Edition.” She was also the first to interview J. K. Rowling on U.S. radio.

Her spiritual path always played an important role in her life and she was an elder in the Covenant of the Goddess. She also worked in the Unitarian Universalist faith community and was a very well respected Wiccan priestess in the Gardnerian tradition.

GlowingHer preeminent book, "Drawing Down the Moon" was first published in 1979 and has significantly influenced Paganism ever since. This seminal book was the first extensive study of modern American Paganism. Her sociological standpoint in the book along with groundbreaking interviews of everyday Pagans was refreshing and insightful at a time when legitimate materials about Witchcraft, Wicca and neo-Paganism were scarce.

Her other books include:
"Heretic's Heart: A Journey Through Spirit and Revolution" (a memoir), "Our Way to the Stars", "Out for Blood" and "Vampires Are Us". She contributed to many other works.

Adler was born in Little Rock, Arkansas and received her BA in political science from U.C. Berkeley. She was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard and her master's degree is from New York's Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Her love of New York continued throughout her life.

References & Resources:

Drawing Down the Moon has been updated and revised several times:

  • Original edition 1979, hardcover, ISBN 0-670-28342-8 (Viking, New York)
  • Original edition 1979, paperback, ISBN 0-8070-3237-9 (Beacon Press, Boston)
  • Revised edition 1986, paperback, ISBN 0-8070-3253-0 (Beacon Press, Boston)
  • Revised edition 1996, paperback, ISBN 0-14-019536-X (Penguin, New York)
  • Revised edition 2006, paperback, ISBN 0-14-303819-2 (Penguin, New York)

Additional Websites for Margot Adler:

Submitted especially for PaganPath • Tuesday, January 15, 2002 10:45 AM CST • Submitted by Susun S. Weed and Rachel Harris • No reprinting without permission from the author!

About the Author: Susun S. Weed
Susun Weed, has been living the simple life for more than 30 years as an herbalist, goatkeeper, homesteader, and feminist. In addition to being the author of four highly-acclaimed books on herbs and women's health, Susun lectures world-wide as the voice of the Wise Woman tradition, is editor of Ash Tree Publishing, and directs the activities of the Wise Woman Center, where she trains apprentices in the shamanic arts, and plays with the fairies. Her books are used by more than a million women, and have been translated into German and French.  See more about Susan Weed at the end of this article.

The Goddess is Alive in Every Woman
The True Story of How She Came to Be,
How She Disappeared, and How She Returned

Copyright © 1999 Susun S. Weed: Permission for use on PaganPath.com provided by the author!

In the beginning, everything began, as it always does, with birth. The Great Mother of All gave birth, and the Earth began to breathe. Again, and again, and again, the Great Mother gave birth. And the plants began to breathe and the animals began to breathe and the two-legged ones began to breathe. All forms of life began to breathe. To breathe, to live. In the air, on the land, in the water, and even in the fires of deep sulfurous vents where light never shines, all forms of life began to breathe. And they were all very hungry.

"What shall we eat?" they asked the Great Mother. "You eat me," she said with a smile. And they did. They ate of Her body. The plants sent their roots down into the earth and they ate of Her flesh and Her bones. The plants drank Her clear blood. From her deep springs, from her flowing waters, the plants ate. And they grew strong. And they gave birth. The grasses multiplied and rippled in the wind. Roots grew fat and juicy. And everywhere there were amazingly-shaped leaves, and flowers of many colors, and fruits wondrous to behold.

The animals ate Her. They did not eat Her flesh and Her bones as the plants did. They could not send their roots into Her, for they had legs and they moved about on the face of the Earth. Some of the animals ate of the grasses that grew from the Mother. Some of the two-legged ones ate the seeds of the grasses and the roots of the plants and their leaves. They ate and they ate and they ate. They began to give to birth, too. Soon there were many, many mouths eating the Mother. There were many, many feet stirring up the red dust of the Mother. There were many mouths to praise her abundance. And many mouths to feed.

"I am you and you are me. I am here for you to eat. Now eat me. Eat all of me." she urged them. And some of the animals ate Her flesh and Her bones in the form of the other animals. And some of the two-legged ones ate Her flesh and Her bones in the form of the animals. And her clear blood became red. And this red blood flowed in the bodies of the animals and the bodies of the two-leggeds who ate of the animals who ate of the plants who ate of Her. And the Great Mother was well pleased.

Now this red blood flowed in the bodies of the two-legged ones. It flowed in their bodies and it sang to them. This red blood sang to them of the endless wisdom of the Great Mother, and the endless dance of the moon, and the endless spiral of birth and life and death. And the ones who were round and full like the Mother felt the blood stirring in their bellies. The good red blood moved in their bellies and they were full of wonder, and they said to the Mother: "What shall we do with the red blood that moves so strongly in our bellies, Mother?" And she replied: "Give it to me. Return this blood to me. Nourish me. Allow me to replenish myself from your blood." And so they did.

Each month when the moon grew dark and disappeared, the blood began to flow from between the legs of some of the two-legged ones. From the wombs of the two-legged ones, the blood flowed: red and rich and nourishing. The red blood flowed into Her and she said: "You are me and I am you. Your blood is my blood. And my blood is yours. Forever and forever, we will nourish each other. And if you will keep holy the days of your bleeding, I will teach you all the secrets of the plants and the animals. And if you will keep holy the days of your bleeding, I will teach you all the secrets of Heaven and Earth." And so the women kept holy the days of their bleeding, and they grew wise in the ways of the plants, the ways of the animals, and the ways of Heaven and Earth.

And so it was for many, many turns of the Earth around the Sun. Until the change. No one really knows where it started. Like a small fire, at first it seemed harmless. The women were wise and they thought no harm could come to them. Were they not the very Earth herself? To harm a woman, was it not the same as harming the Mother? And who would be so foolish as to harm their own Mother? To harm the source of nourishment and comfort and strength?

Yet there were those who were so foolish. Deluded, they grew arrogant, and began to tell the story of creation in a strange way. They began to believe that a man gave birth to the Earth and to humans! They said that man was the source of all nourishment and wisdom. They said that man was the image of God, and that God was jealous, and angry, that God demanded pain and blood and despised the simple pleasures of the body, of the earth. They said that God lived above, not within the earth, that God lived in heaven and was above all life. They said that men were above all life, too. That man had dominion over all of life, over all of the Earth herself, to do with as he pleased.

Oh, how silly their stories were. Surely no one could believe such stories! Surely everyone could see clearly that woman was the source of life, and nourishment. Surely it was clear that the women's blood was the life of the Earth and the life of the people. And that the pleasure of the body was holy, was sacred, was good. That the Earth was alive, was our true Mother, and must be respected. That we are part of Her, dependent on Her for our very breath.

But, like a small fire left alone when the wind is blowing, the strange stories of God, of man as creator, grew and multiplied. The small fire of deceit rapidly became a raging storm, a storm that threatened all life. For the men began to say that the blood of women was bad, that women's moon time blood was dirty, unclean, even dangerous. They began to say that women themselves were dirty and dangerous. They began to say that the Earth was dirty and dangerous. They began to think of themselves as apart from the Earth, as separate from the Earth, as better than the Earth. They began to think of themselves as apart from women, as superior to women, as the master of women.

The women did their best to tend to the holy fires. The women did their best to keep the days of their bleeding sacred. The women did their best to teach their daughters how to learn from the plants and the animals and the Earth. And the women did their best to be true to the mysteries of the moon-time and the wisdom of the Great Mother.

But the men were lost. Without the wisdom of the women, alone and apart, the men forgot the ways of peace. They forgot that the Earth was their Mother. They forgot that all women were sacred. And they began to fight. At first they fought only among themselves. But soon the sickness spread and the men began to fight the women. They began to torture the women. They began to kill the women. They bound women's feet for this pain gave men pleasure.

They burned women at the stake for how dare any woman pretend to know the healing ways of the plants. They stoned women to death for it frightened them to see even the smallest bit of her holy flesh. They cut out the pleasure parts from between her legs for here was a power that seemed uncontrollable. And they told her, again and again, until she began to believe it was true, that she was not sacred, that she was not made in the image of God.

The men told each other that women were inferior, that the animals were inferior, and that the plants were inferior. Soon, puffed up with false pride, the men began to devise ways to use the women and the animals and the plants without respect for their power, without respect for their sacredness. The men began to believe that their view of the world was the only view of the world.

From one side of the Earth to the other, they abused the women and the plants and the animals. They used them without regard and kept them locked away. They ignored the cries of pain. They came to believe that women and plants and animals actually enjoyed being hurt. They confused some women so terribly that these women began to believe that they actually were dirty and in need of punishment. They tortured so many women that the wisdom of the women seemed to be the lie, and the lies of the men took on the trappings of truth.

But the Great Mother lives in every woman. In every place and every time, the Great Mother shows herself in the form of every living woman. "Eat me." she whispers in the dreams of the woman. And the woman throws off the bed covers and walks barefoot into the moonlit night. She is yearning. She feels a deep stirring in her belly. She looks at the moon and she fancies that she hears the moon speaking to her. "You are sacred. You are the beginning and the end of all existence. I am you and you are me. Keep sacred the days of your bleeding and I will share with you the wisdom of the plants and the animals and the very Earth."

Can she believe it is true? Dare she believe the truth of the words she seems to hear? All her life she has been told that she is not pretty enough, nor smart enough, not strong enough. Everything seems to tell her that she is too round, too emotional, too sensitive. And not sacred, in fact, the complete opposite of sacred. All the days of her life she has heard the stories of the wonders of man, the creator. She has heard it so often that it has the sound of truth: God is a man. God is all powerful, so men are all powerful (and women are weak). God is clean, so men are clean (and women are dirty). God is pure, so men are pure (and women are filth). God never bleeds from between his legs and men never bleed from between their legs (so the flowing blood of women is a sickness, a curse, a punishment). How can she believe that her blood is sacred? How can she allow herself to feel pleasure, to name it good, to name it holy? How can she dare to believe that she is the Goddess?

Yes, the Goddess! The Goddess who is alive in every woman, in every place, in every time. The Goddess who whispers in our dreams. The Goddess who smiles in our lives. The Goddess who stirs the blood in our bellies. The Goddess who knows that every woman is wise and powerful and sacred. The Goddess who calls to us: "Keep the days of your bleeding sacred. Remember that your blood is the blood of life, the blood of peace. Feed me your blood, your moon-time blood, oh my daughter, my lover. Feed me, for I hunger and I thirst for you.

"Return to me. Return to yourself. Remember yourself. Remember me. I am the Great Mother. I am the Goddess. I am the Wise Woman. Listen to my words. Listen to my song. I am in you, thus I can never be lost. My story is your story. And it is the true story of birth and life and death. Eat me. Feed me. You are woman and so am I. Through me, you exist; through you, I exist. We are the ones who create. We are the ones who nourish. We are the ones who open the gates between the worlds. We are the ones who must reclaim ourselves, who must reweave ourselves.

"Oh sister, dear sister, the threads are thin, the song is faint. Tell me it is not too late. Tell me that you hear me. Tell me that you believe me. Tell me that the Goddess has returned. Tell me you are listening to the plants and the animals and your own deep knowing. Tell me you are looking past the slick, simple lies and into the messy, complex truth. Tell me that you feel the red blood stirring in your belly.

"Tell me it is not too late. Tell me the sisters are awakening. Tell me the moonlodge is rebuilt. Tell me that the words of White Buffalo Calf Woman were not in vain. Tell me that Kwan Yin's heart is not breaking. Tell me that Venus is safe. Tell me that Artemis roams free in the woods. Tell me that Lilith is welcome at your table. Tell me that you remember that pleasure is holy to me. Tell me that you refuse to believe that you delight in pain.

"Tell me that you feel me reaching out to you from the deep core of your being, from time out of mind. Tell me that you feel me waking up inside you, waking you up to your beauty and your power. Tell me that you are reclaiming your truth and turning a deaf ear to the lies. Tell me that you remember that you are the Goddess. Tell me that you remember that you and I are the same. Tell me you keep sacred the days of your bleeding. Tell me you honor your crones.

"I have been with you since the beginning, and I will be with you at the end. I am part of you and you are part of me. Allow me to love you. Allow me to honor you. Allow me to return."

More About the Author: Susun S. Weed

Susun Weed - PO Box 64, Woodstock, NY 12498 (fax) 1-845-246-8081

Visit Susun Weed at: www.susunweed.com and www.ashtreepublishing.com

Susun S. Weed's Books Include:

Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year
Author: Susun S. Weed. Simple, safe remedies for pregnancy, childbirth, lactation, and newborns. Includes herbs for fertility and birth control. Foreword by Jeannine Parvati Baker. 196 pages, index, illustrations. Find it at: www.ash-tree-publishing.com

Healing Wise 
Author: Susun S. Weed. Superb herbal in the feminine-intuitive mode. Complete instructions for using common plants for food, beauty, medicine, and longevity. Introduction by Jean Houston. 312 pages, index, illustrations. Find it at: www.ash-tree-publishing.com

NEW Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way
Author: Susun S. Weed. The best book on menopause is now better. Completely revised with 100 new pages. All the remedies women know and trust plus hundreds of new ones. New sections on thyroid health, fibromyalgia, hairy problems, male menopause, and herbs for women taking hormones. Recommended by Susan Love MD and Christiane Northrup MD. Foreword by Juliette de Bairacli Levy. 304 pages, index, illustrations. 
Find it at: www.ash-tree-publishing.com
For more great info on menopause, visit: www.menopause-metamorphosis.com

Breast Cancer? Breast Health! 
Author: Susun S. Weed. Foods, exercises, and attitudes to keep your breasts healthy. Supportive complimentary medicines to ease side-effects of surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or tamoxifen. Foreword by Christiane Northrup, M.D. 380 pages, index, illustrations. Find it at: www.ash-tree-publishing.com

Submitted especially for PaganPath • Tuesday, January 15, 2002 10:45 AM CST • Submitted by Susun S. Weed and Rachel Harris • No reprinting without permission from the author!

About the Author: Susun S. Weed
Susun Weed, has been living the simple life for more than 30 years as an herbalist, goatkeeper, homesteader, and feminist. In addition to being the author of four highly-acclaimed books on herbs and women's health, Susun lectures world-wide as the voice of the Wise Woman tradition, is editor of Ash Tree Publishing, and directs the activities of the Wise Woman Center, where she trains apprentices in the shamanic arts, and plays with the fairies. Her books are used by more than a million women, and have been translated into German and French.  See more about Susan Weed at the end of this article.

Weeds in Your Garden? --Bite Back!

Copyright © 1999 Susun S. Weed: Permission for use on PaganPath.com provided by the author!

I always say the gardener's best revenge is to eat the weeds. I've been doing it for thirty years and can testify that my health and the health of my garden has never been better. Here are a few hints for gardeners who'd rather eat their weeds than hate them (and for non-gardeners who are adventurous enough to try out nature's bounty).

View your weeds as cultivated plants; give them the same care and you'll reap a tremendous harvest. Harvest frequently and do it when the weeds are young and tender. Thin your weeds and pinch back the annuals so your weeds become lushly leafy. Use weeds as rotation crops; they bring up subsoil minerals and protect against many insects. "Interplant" (by not weeding out) selected weeds; try purslane, lamb's quarters, or amaranth with your corn, chickweed with peas/beans, and yellow dock, sheep sorrel, or dandelion with tomatoes). And, most importantly, harvest your weeds frequently, regularly, and generously.

Overgrown radishes, lettuces, and beans are tough and bitter. So are weeds that aren't harvested frequently enough. Give your chickweed a haircut (yes! with scissors) every 4-7 days and it will stay tender all spring, ready to be added to any salad. If you forget a patch for two weeks, it may get stringy and tough and full of seed capsules. (All is not lost at this stage. The seeds are easy to collect – put the entire plant in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for 2-3 days and use the seeds that fall to the bottom of the bag – and highly nutritious, with exceptional amounts of protein and minerals.

Unthinned carrots and lettuces grow thin and spindly, so do unthinned lamb's quarters, amaranth, and other edible weeds. Wherever you decide to let the weeds grow, keep them thinned as you would any plant you expect to eat. Here's how I do it: In early spring I lightly top-dress a raised bed with my cool-method compost (which is loaded with the seeds of edible weeds). Over this I strew a heavy coating of the seeds of lettuces and cresses and brassicas (cultivated salad greens), then another light covering of shifted compost.

Naturally, weed seeds germinate right along with my salad greens. When the plant are about two inches high, I go through the bed and thin the salad greens, pull out all grasses, smartweeds, cronewort, clear weed, and quick weed (though the last three are edible, I don't find them particularly palatable). And, I thin back the chickweed, mallows, lamb's quarters, amaranth, and garlic mustard and other edible wild greens.

Keep those annuals pinched back. You wouldn't let your basil go straight up and go to flower, don't let your lamb's quarter either. One cultivated lamb's quarter plant in my garden grew five feet high and four feet across, providing greens for salads and cooking all summer and a generous harvest of seeds for winter use.

When a crop of greens has bolted or gone to seed in your garden, you pull it all out and replant with another crop. Do the same with your weeds. We eat the greens of garlic mustard all spring, then pull it out just before it bolts (making a horseradishy vinegar from the choicest roots) -- often revealing a generous crop of chickweed lurking underneath.

Some of my favorite garden weeds:

Annuals

• Amaranth (Amaranthus retroflexus) Young leaves, old leaves, even non-woody stalks are delicious as a cooked green; chop and boil for 30-40 minutes. Serve in their own broth; freeze leftovers for winter use. Use instead of spinach in quiche (you may never to grow spinach again). Collect seeds throughout the autumn by shaking seed heads over a lipped cookie sheet; or by harvest and dry the entire seed head. Winnowing out the chaff is tedious but soothing. There is a special thrill that comes when you toss the chaffy seed in the air, and the breeze catches it just-so, and the seeds fall back into your tray, while the prickly chaff scatters "to the four winds."

• Chickweed (Stellaria media) Young leaves and stalks, even flowers, in salads. Blend with virgin olive oil and organic garlic for an unforgettable pesto. Add seeds to porridge.

• Lamb's quarter (Chenopodium alba and related species, e.g. Chenopodium quinoa). Young leaves in salads. Older leaves and tender stalks cooked. Leaves dried and ground into flour (replaces up to half the flour in any recipe). Seeds dried and cooked in soups, porridge.

• Mallows (Malva neglecta and related species) Leaves of any age and flowers (the closely related Hibiscus flowers too!) are delicious in salads. Roots are used medicinally.

• Purslane (Portulacca oleracea) The fleshy leaves and stalks of this plant are incredibly delicious in salads and not bad at all preserved in vinegar for winter use.

Biennials

• Burdock (Arctium lappa) Roots of non-flowering plants harvested after frost make a vinegar that is deep, and richly flavorful as well as a world-renowned tonic. Petioles of the leaves and the flowering stalk are also edible; for recipes see my book Healing Wise.

• Garlic Mustard (Alliaria officinalis) Year-round salad green. Leaves used in any season, even winter. Roots are harvested before plant flowers. Seeds are a spicy condiment.

• Queen Anne's Lace (Daucus carota) Leaves finely chopped in salads. Flowers are beautiful edible decorations. Roots of non-flowering plants, harvested in the fall, and cooked.

Perennials

• Dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis) Leaves eaten at any time, raw or cooked, but especially tasty in the fall – not spring!. Roots harvested any time; pickle in apple cider vinegar for winter use. Dandelion flower wine is justly famous.

• Sheep Sorrel (Rumex acetosella) Leaves add a sour spark to salads. Cooked with wild leeks or cultivated onion and potato they become a soup called "schav."

• Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica) Young leaves cooked for 40-45 minutes and served in their broth are one of my favorite dishes. Seeds can be used in baked goods, porridge.

• Yellow dock (Rumex crispus) Roots pickled in apple cider vinegar are tasty and a boon for enriching the blood. Leaves, especially young ones, are eaten raw or cooked.

More About the Author: Susun S. Weed

Susun Weed - PO Box 64, Woodstock, NY 12498 (fax) 1-845-246-8081

Visit Susun Weed at: www.susunweed.com and www.ashtreepublishing.com

Susun S. Weed's Books Include:

Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year
Author: Susun S. Weed. Simple, safe remedies for pregnancy, childbirth, lactation, and newborns. Includes herbs for fertility and birth control. Foreword by Jeannine Parvati Baker. 196 pages, index, illustrations. Find it at: www.ash-tree-publishing.com

Healing Wise 
Author: Susun S. Weed. Superb herbal in the feminine-intuitive mode. Complete instructions for using common plants for food, beauty, medicine, and longevity. Introduction by Jean Houston. 312 pages, index, illustrations. Find it at: www.ash-tree-publishing.com

NEW Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way
Author: Susun S. Weed. The best book on menopause is now better. Completely revised with 100 new pages. All the remedies women know and trust plus hundreds of new ones. New sections on thyroid health, fibromyalgia, hairy problems, male menopause, and herbs for women taking hormones. Recommended by Susan Love MD and Christiane Northrup MD. Foreword by Juliette de Bairacli Levy. 304 pages, index, illustrations. 
Find it at: www.ash-tree-publishing.com
For more great info on menopause, visit: www.menopause-metamorphosis.com

Breast Cancer? Breast Health! 
Author: Susun S. Weed. Foods, exercises, and attitudes to keep your breasts healthy. Supportive complimentary medicines to ease side-effects of surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or tamoxifen. Foreword by Christiane Northrup, M.D. 380 pages, index, illustrations. Find it at: www.ash-tree-publishing.com

PaganPath Academy & Witchcraft Classes Open Enrollment Now

PaganPath Academy Enrollment:

Our Academy remains the most outstanding available, and also the least costly!  Join any or all of the courses in the Academy for $49 a year, and start your classes right now. Become a Premium Member & Enroll in the Academy here or join as a Free Full Member here to access more great stuff.